Aspes 50cc Machines

Aspes (1967-1982):

Mostly manufactured 125cc bikes alongside the 50cc ranges. The 50cc’s Aspes of the 1970’s and 80’s used Minarelli or Sachs engines.


Aspes Related Information:

  • Sheldon’s EMU Aspes page here.
  • Wheels of Italy Aspes page here.
  • Aspes Navaho 50 (1971-1980) story here.

Aspes Featured 50cc Machines:

Aspes was an Italian motorcycle company active from 1961 to 1982. Founded in Gallarate in the late fifties by Teodosio Sorrentino, the name Aspes derives from the abbreviation of the wife’s surname (Aspesi). The company was born for the production of bicycles, but starting from 1961 began the construction of classic mopeds like the Falco. Quickly the range was extended for young users with the Sport models (1964) and Sprint (1966) driven by a two-stroke Minarelli P4. In 1967, on the basis of the tourist model S, a version called Cross T (Cross Teodosio) was prepared. This was the first attempt by Aspes to enter the off-road motorbike segment, in those years particularly popular with young people. The Cross T had a lukewarm success, enough to push the company to insist on the project and realize the Cross model, resulting in production earlier, the Cross Special ’68 “and later the” Cross Special ’69 “, which stood out from the others contemporary products, for the modernity of the solutions adopted and the quality of the components used in the construction Just after the CS ’69, the “Junior Cross ’70” model was adopted, adopting the same frame as the CS ’68 and CS’ 69, but with economic components and some differences in aesthetics.The 1970 saw the presentation of the Apache 125, with which the Aspes inaugurated the tradition of baptizing their models with names of the tribes of the American Indians. the adoption of the Ceriani competition fork, for the swingarm mounted on elastic bushings, for the sturdy drawn steel frame and the 18 HP rotating disc Maico motor that favored a very competitive vehicle and used by private riders. The most important news, however, was the entry into the company of Piermario Sorrentino, the eldest son of Theodosius and a great lover of speed racing. At its insistence, Aspes started the modernization of road mopeds, putting into production the Super Sport model and starting a rather ambitious project for the production of racing motorcycles, able to perform well in the Italian Juniores Speed ​​Championship. On the wave of the first sporting successes, obtained with the Cross Special 71 model by Felice Agostini (younger brother of the world champion Giacomo), Aspes presented at the Milan Motor Show 1971 the Navaho, a cross-country moped that was very successful among the very young. thanks to its angular and essential superstructures (made of glass fiber) painted in bright metallic colors. In the same exhibition, the 125 Junior Speed ​​track prototype was on display, which fitted the first Aspes engine, designed and built by the well-known Gianfranco Maestroni technician, taken from Yamaha Italia. Some prototypes of the new engine were also mounted on Apache frames and, after long phases of study and testing, Aspes decided to produce the 125 cm³ engines on its own, founding the associated ASCO (acronym of Aspesi Consiglio) that incorporated the mechanical workshop Eng. Vito Consiglio di San Martino Siccomario, author of the process of development and industrialization. 1972 saw the entry on the market of the Hopi 125, heir of the Apache. Contrary to the majority of manufacturers in the sector, Aspes decided not to use the Sachs engine, but to build its own engine. The Hopi will have some success in the Cross, while in the Regularity will bail out a little treatable engine. In 1973 the Casa di Gallarate presented, at the Milan Motor Show, the Juma, a 125 road with the engine derived from that of the Hopi. The bike will go into production since 1974, obtaining a good success in France, where under the BPS importer’s banner it will prove unbeatable in the series motorbike competitions. The Juma will prove to be the 125 fastest on the market (135 km / h top speed). The models already in the catalog are then restated, with further developments (since 1977 the Hopi gains a 6-speed gearbox), while in ’77 the “Criterium Monomarca Aspes Yuma” started, the first example of a single-brand trophy in Italy, held until 1979 , which will give the opportunity to many young drivers (Loris Reggiani, Fausto Gresini, Maurizio Vitali, Davide Tardozzi and others) to emerge. The end of the seventies, however, marks a decline in Aspes: Navaho has long lost its stylistic originality, the Hopi has little success (due to a more engine than Cross that by Regularity), while Yuma is the fastest in its category, but it is also the most expensive. The House of Gallarate will try to buffer the situation by proposing mopeds of traditional mold (the “Sioux”) and a 125 less boost of the Yuma (the “Yuma TSB”), both of very little success. The adventure of Aspes ends in 1982, when the Unimoto (born in Cesena in 1980 from the ashes of Milani) absorbed the House of Gallarate, using the Aspes Mark until 1984 before also ceasing the activity in 1986. Founded in Gallarate in the late fifties by Theodosius Sorrentino, the name Aspes derives from the abbreviation of the surname (Aspesi) of his wife. The company was born for the production of bicycles, but starting from 1961 began the construction of classic mopeds like the Falco. Quickly the range was extended for young users with the Sport models (1964) and Sprint (1966) driven by a two-stroke Minarelli P4. In 1967, on the basis of the tourist model S, a version called Cross T (Cross Teodosio) was prepared. This was the first attempt by Aspes to enter the off-road motorbike segment, in those years particularly popular with young people. The Cross T had a lukewarm success, enough to push the company to insist on the project and realize the Cross model, resulting in the first production, of the Cross Special ’68 “and later of the” Cross Special ’69 “, which were distinguished from others contemporary products, for the modernity of the solutions adopted and the quality of the components used in the construction Just after the CS ’69, the “Junior Cross ’70” model was adopted, adopting the same frame as the CS ’68 and CS’ 69, but with economic components and some differences in aesthetics.The 1970 saw the presentation of the Apache 125, with which the Aspes inaugurated the tradition of baptizing its models with the names of the tribes of the American Indians. The bike was distinguished by the adoption of the Ceriani competition fork, for the swingarm mounted on elastic bushings, for the sturdy drawn steel frame and the 18-hp rotating disc Maico engine that made it a very competitive vehicle and used by private riders . The most important news, however, was the entry into the company of Piermario Sorrentino, the eldest son of Theodosius and a great lover of speed racing. At its insistence, Aspes started the modernization of road mopeds, putting into production the Super Sport model and starting a rather ambitious project for the production of racing motorcycles, able to perform well in the Italian Juniores Speed ​​Championship. On the wave of the first sporting successes, obtained with the Cross Special 71 model by Felice Agostini (younger brother of the world champion Giacomo), Aspes presented at the Milan Motor Show 1971 the Navaho, a cross-country moped that was very successful among the very young. thanks to its angular and essential superstructures (made of glass fiber) painted in bright metallic colors. In the same exhibition, the 125 Junior Speed ​​track prototype was on display, which fitted the first Aspes engine, designed and built by the well-known Gianfranco Maestroni technician, taken from Yamaha Italia. Some prototypes of the new engine were also mounted on Apache frames and, after long phases of study and testing, Aspes decided to produce the 125 cm³ engines on its own, founding the associated ASCO (acronym of Aspesi Consiglio) that incorporated the mechanical workshop Eng. Vito Consiglio di San Martino Siccomario, author of the process of development and industrialization. 1972 saw the entry on the market of the Hopi 125, heir of the Apache. Contrary to the majority of manufacturers in the sector, Aspes decided not to use the Sachs engine, but to build its own engine. The Hopi will have some success in the Cross, while in the Regularity will bail out a little treatable engine. In 1973 the Casa di Gallarate presented, at the Milan Motor Show, the Juma, a 125 road with the engine derived from that of the Hopi. The bike will go into production since 1974, obtaining a good success in France, where under the BPS importer’s banner it will prove unbeatable in the series motorbike competitions. The Juma will prove to be the 125 fastest on the market (135 km / h top speed). The models already in the catalog are then restated, with further developments (since 1977 the Hopi gains a 6-speed gearbox), while in ’77 the “Criterium Monomarca Aspes Yuma” started, the first example of a single-brand trophy in Italy, held until 1979 , which will give the opportunity to many young drivers (Loris Reggiani, Fausto Gresini, Maurizio Vitali, Davide Tardozzi and others) to emerge. The end of the seventies, however, marks a decline in Aspes: Navaho has long lost its stylistic originality, the Hopi has little success (due to a more engine than Cross that by Regularity), while Yuma is the fastest in its category, but it is also the most expensive. The House of Gallarate will try to buffer the situation by proposing mopeds of traditional mold (the “Sioux”) and a 125 less boost of the Yuma (the “Yuma TSB”), both of very little success. The adventure of Aspes ends in 1982, when the Unimoto (born in Cesena in 1980 from the ashes of Milani) absorbed the House of Gallarate, using the Aspes Mark until 1984 before also ceasing the activity in 1986.

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